Grandparents As Parents

Being a grandparent is one of the best things this side of heaven. Each grandparent thinks their grandchildren are the cutest in the world. Their grandchildren are the smartest, so much smarter than their children were at that age. When grandchildren come to visit, grandparents give them almost anything they desire. They let them do whatever their hearts can imagine and more. This is so true for the preteen grandchildren. As they grow into teenage years it’s another story. Grandparents love grandchildren because after all the fun they have, the food they have eaten, the playing they have done and much more they are packed up and sent home to their parents. Grandparents can then go back to whatever they want to do–they’ve earned it.

Some grandparents can’t send their grandchildren home to their parents because they have become the parents. There have always been grandparents that raised their grandchildren for some reason. There was always Big Mama Susie, Granny Louise, Paw Paw, Daddy James and more who took on the role of raising a grandchild.

In the state of Texas alone there are approximately 823,750 children under the age of 18 living in homes where the householders are grandparents or other relatives with the majority living with grandparents.

According to the Grandfacts State Fact Sheets there are over 315,000 grandparents that are raising grandchildren. Of those:

  • 67% are under the age 60
  • 62% are still in the workforce
  • 23% live in poverty
  • 23% have a disability
  • 26% are unmarried (grandchildren are living with a single parent)

These grandparents having raised their children have once again taken on the responsibility for the day-to-day maintenance of a home, schedules, meals, homework, play dates and more. These items may seem simple, but homework is not the same as it was a generation ago. Years ago play dates consisted of going outside and playing with the kids in the neighborhood. There was no scheduling of activities. Birthday parties consisted of cake, punch and a few games in the backyard or den. There was no social media, cell phones and internet. In addition to time, the majority of these things carry a monetary component.

The grandparents who are raising their grandchildren now have to redo their lives, their dreams and much more. They have to give up their independence and start all over again. Their finances will ultimately take a hit, and retirement may not be in the picture in the near future. That dream of finally starting their own business has again become just a dream.

All of this is not to say that grandparents do not cherish their grandchildren, it’s just that their lives or at least the idea of what their lives should look like at this stage of life will have to change. Their new normal is not the normal they day dreamed about.

There are programs that will assist the grandparents in their new role as primary parents. At my church a senior group meets once a month to talk about the good, the bad and the ugly of raising grandchildren when you thought you would only see them on the weekends. It allows the grandparents to learn from others who are in similar situations, and to give guidance to those that need it .

In every state there are organizations that will assist those that are raising children for the second time. AARP has great information in the Grandfacts sheets for the United States and for your state. There are local programs that can assist also.

Grandparents may need a little help when raising grandchildren. Those that take on this task are indeed “grand”. Remember “thisisyourbestyear”, and just in case you didn’t know my grandchild is the cutest and smartest.

Our USA Today Best Years Magazine Interview

We were interviewed by the award winning journalist Jennifer E. Mabry for the USA Today Best Years (Fabulous Living at 50+) 2019 Fall/Winter edition. The topic of the discussion was “50–Embracing Midlife”. It is a topic that “thisisyourbestyear” is very familiar with.

Adding to the conversation were three other women of a certain age. They were Amy Yontef-McCrath who is a volunteer extraordinaire who sat a goal of volunteering to at least 50 projects between birthday 49 and 50. She completed it with time to spare, and is now deciding upon the next goal for this part of her life.

Also included in the conversation was relationship expert and therapist Dr. Audrey Chapman. She gave insight into being mentally and physically healthy as we mature. Brigid Schulte who is an author and journalist discussed work-life balance as we enter different phases of our life.

It was our honor to be included in this conversation. The link to the article is below. You can purchase the magazine at your local news stands or on line on the USA Today Magazines site.

Embracing Midlife

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”. You are never too old to live your best life and do the “happy dance”–we are proof. Just go for it.

Maybe We Should Be More Like Millennials

So we have decided that we will continue to work after we retire. We want to do something different, something that we have always wanted to so. Something that feeds our soul and our passion. Maybe we just want to do something where we are productive, something where there is a chance to get out of the house and communicate with others. There are many reasons that women and men of a certain age want to continue to work after their formal retirement.

Most of us remember when we first started to work and people would wonder if we were old enough for the job. Guess what? Now they wonder are we too old for the job.

You see that gray hair can be a giveaway to our age, and age discrimination is real. I know there are millennials sporting the gray look, but for the most part they get theirs out of a box.

Take it from someone who has finally divorced hair color and decided it is what it is. It does seem interesting that most of the people in power around the world are gray haired or other unnatural hair colors, but when it comes to getting a job it is a deterrent to the interviewer. It’s hard to even get an interview or get through the interview when the interviewer sees you as his mother or God forbid his grandmother.

This article by columnist Mitchel Schnurman recently appeared in the Dallas Morning News. It is an opinion piece, but personally I think it speaks the truth. Does gray hair stop you from getting pass the interview?

Then it hit me, maybe we should follow the lead of the millennials. Remember when we wouldn’t hire them because their hair was blue, hot pink, too long, dredded or whatever? What did they do? They started their own businesses. Why not start our own business doing what we want? We have the time, the experience and education so why not go for it?

Millennials did not wait for baby boomers to hire them so why are we waiting on them to hire us? We taught them to go for it. Let’s take our own advice and just do it.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”. What are you waiting for?

Women Over 50 Are Starting Businesses Left and Right. Should You?

*Guest post by Lucy Reed

You’ve spent years in a career that doesn’t fulfill you, and frankly, you’re tired of it! Now that you’re getting older, you’re serious about spending your time in ways that count.

Does that sound like you? You’re not alone: Lots of women over 50 are chasing their entrepreneurial dreams now that they have the time, confidence, and financial capital to do so.

Why Women Over 50 Start Businesses

Some women start businesses out of necessity. Older women who have recently lost a job or who are reentering the workforce find themselves disappointed by job prospects and decide to create their own opportunity. Other women discover they finally have the time and energy for a passion project now that they’re older. And with fewer people depending on them, older women have more freedom to take risks and fully commit to a business.

The Traits of Successful Female Entrepreneurs

Entrepreneurship isn’t for everyone. You have to be willing to take on financial risk, put yourself out there, and juggle a ton of responsibilities. For some people, it’s a role that comes naturally, while others have perfected the art of faking it until they make it. But if entrepreneurial traits like tenacity, dedication, and risk-taking aren’t in your playbook, business ownership might not be for you.

That doesn’t mean you have to be a cutthroat business woman or a natural salesperson to be a successful entrepreneur. Plenty of over-50 women start businesses in the nonprofit sector or become consultants and solopreneurs. However, whether you’re running a multinational corporation or a one-woman bookkeeping service, you need to be comfortable with marketing yourself and maintaining a public image.

Financial Considerations for Older Entrepreneurs

Starting a business can be a way to grow your income add to your nest egg after 50, but it’s no guarantee. Launching any business is a financial risk, and it’s even more so for women, who are likely to tap personal savings for startup capital. That’s because women entrepreneurs have a harder time than men raising startup capital for business ventures.

While it’s possible to tap retirement savings to start a business, the process is convoluted, and a mistake could lead to hefty IRS penalties. There’s also the risk that your business doesn’t succeed and the loss sets your retirement back years. Before going this route, explore other funding options like Small Business Administration microloans, alternative lenders, or even crowdfunding.  

Steps to Starting a Small Business

There’s a lot of work that has to be done before getting to the fun parts of business ownership, like building a brand and pitching your product or service. If you’re interested in starting a small business, take these steps to get started.

  • Assess the feasibility of your business idea. You have a great idea, but is it a profitable one? It doesn’t matter how much creativity or passion you have if you’re selling something no one wants to buy. Conduct research and surveys to evaluate who your target market is, what their needs are, and how much they’re willing to pay to have those needs met.
  • Obtain licenses and permits. The licenses and permits you need depend on the nature of your business. At minimum, you’ll need to register your business and file for an EIN.
  • Identify key partnerships. Strong networks make strong businesses. Establish relationships with suppliers, retailers, local businesses, and other partners who can help your business grow.
  • Create a marketing plan. Websites, social media, local marketing–today’s entrepreneurs have a lot of opportunities to get their ideas in front of an audience. Before launching campaigns, determine which marketing channels are best for your target audience.

There’s no expiration date on entrepreneurship. Whether you’re 26 or 55, if you have a good idea, you can turn it into a profitable business venture. While starting a business after 40 can feel like a leap of faith, sometimes that leap is just what you need to bring purpose and passion to your life.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”–look before you leap.

*Lucy Reed has been starting businesses since she was a kid, from the lemonade stand she opened in her parent’s drivway at age 10 to the dog walking business she started while in college. She created GigMine.co because she was inspired by the growth of the sharing economy and wanted to make it easier for entrepreneurial individuals like herself to find the gig opportunities in their areas.

5 Simple Steps For Landing A Seasonal Job During The Holidays

*guest post by Erica Francis

seasonal employment

5 Simple Steps for Landing a Seasonal Job During the Holidays

Interested in a little extra cash this holiday season? A seasonal job is a great way to buffer a period of unemployment or offset your spending on gifts. It might even be just what you need to get your foot in the door for a more permanent position of employment. Check out these tips to help you land the perfect position this holiday season!

1. Consider if a Seasonal Job Right for You

Before you start searching for seasonal work, go over the pros and cons with yourself. On top of making some extra money, seasonal jobs can get you big discounts on holiday purchases and help you build up your resume for future job searches. But the work doesn’t come without its drawbacks. Many seasonal jobs offer low pay and little training so they may not be great options if you’re looking to advance your career. Additionally, you have to be ready to accept a tough schedule, which may involve working during evenings and weekends. This can conflict with travel plans and reduce your free time to spend with friends and family,

2. Take a Look at Your Options

Not all seasonal jobs are retail positions. Although you may be happy to fill in at the mall during the holiday rush, you have other options. Customer service representatives, social media assistants and seasonal recruiters are in high demand during the holiday season. Additionally, seasonal decorators and event planners are highly sought after by stores, offices, and homeowners alike. You may even want to consider personal gift shopping or working as a professional Santa. If you aren’t interested in a holiday position, pet sitting might be a great option for you. Many people travel during the holidays and need someone who can tend to their pets while they’re away.

3. Start Searching for Opportunities

Care.com recommends seeking out work that you enjoy rather than taking the first job that comes along. You can find hidden career opportunities by looking for entry-level positions in a field that you enjoy. If you’re interested in fashion, try applying for work in a clothing store. If you like journalism, start with a job at the library. Try to network as much as possible by talking to friends, family, and even strangers who may be able to help you get a lead on a job. Reach out to people online and be sure to meet them in person to establish valuable relationships. Volunteering in your community during the holidays is a great way to make connections, gain references, and test out your field of interest as well.

4. Polish Your Resume

Seasonal work is competitive, so make sure you apply with an eye-catching resume to set yourself apart. Personalize your resume for each job you apply for, paying close attention to the skills and experience required by the position. If you have gaps in your work history or many seasonal jobs, try switching up your resume format to focus on skills and experience rather than past employment. Consider putting your related skills near the top of your resume so managers can see that you would be adept at the position. Have a separate section on your resume for any past temporary positions labeled either “holiday” or “seasonal” so recruiters don’t think you frequently hop between jobs.

5. Ace the Interview

Although the job you’re applying for is temporary, recruiters will still put you through a thorough interview. Be prepared to answer questions about your flexibility, why you’re interested in temporary work and what your plans are for when the season ends. Don’t forget to do your research on the company and have a familiarity with their products and services.

Although the holidays are rich in employment opportunities, start looking for work early. According to Snag, over half of employers have already filled their seasonal positions before the busy seasons starts. You’ll have more options to choose from if you get a head start. That way, you’re more likely to land a job that you can actually enjoy.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”.  Let’s get that job!

*Erica Francis has an important mission: to help people prepare for successful careers in today’s tough job market. At ReadyJob.org, Erica helps develop lesson plans and other educational resources, all geared toward helping the site’s visitors build the skills needed to excel in any workplace.

Walking The Walk

I am sure there are others, but Mrs. Doreetha Daniels at the age of 99 is one of my inspirations.  After taking decades off she decided to give college a try. This lady has had a successful career, successful marriage, raised a family and has great-grandchildren. Getting a degree was something that she always wanted to, but as it is with a lot of us life just got in the way.

Her story is one that many people have endured. Some of things that she endured are listed below.

  • Unable to meet state residency requirements
  • Got married
  • Raised a family
  • Death in the family
  • Illness
  • Too old
  • Transportation problems
  • Unable to use technology
  • And on and on…..

None of these things deterred Doreetha Daniels from doing what she sat out to do.  She received her Associate’s Degree just before her 100th birthday and has not decided what she will do next–maybe a Bachelor’s Degree.  Sounds kind of like the average college graduate.

Take a look at Doreetha.  Let her be an example for all of us. She is a woman of a certain age who sat a goal and accomplished it.

What’s stopping you from accomplishing your goal of a new career, starting a business, traveling, writing, becoming a chef or anything else?

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”.  You can do it. Read more about Doreetha’s journey here.

 

It’s Never Too Late–Just Ask Me

It was a great evening being interviewed by Matt Blake and Casey Sanders of the show “Inspired to Greatness”. The discussion was about the subject It’s Never too Late.  As a woman of a certain age, it was an easy conversation for me to have.

Hope you will enjoy the conversation

 

To hear more conversations with Matt and Casey go to Inspired to Greatness.  Enjoy the conversations, and remember it’s never too late because “thisisyourbestyear”.

Women Building Leadership–WFF

The movement is strong and getting stronger.  Women are taking their lives and situations into their own hands.  They know that it is now or never.  Strong women in all fields of endeavor have started mentoring, sharing and encouraging women to become the best they can in whatever they desire.

In Dallas, Texas on March 4–March 7 WFF (Women’s Foodservice Forum) will continue their effort to lead the way to gender equity in the food service industry.  WFF wants to create a successful model that can be shared and emulated in other industries.

The food service industry is the second largest employer of women behind the federal government.  In 1989 the WFF was established to assist women in building their skills, expanding their knowledge and broadening their perspectives through education, mentoring and connections. Encouraging them to gain the leadership skills that will allow them to reach their full career potential is one of the main focuses of WFF. They strive to assist women develop their skill set all through their career journey–from beginning (entry level) to the end (CEO).

Hattie Hill, the President and CEO has been involved with WFF since it’s inception.  She sees the correlation of the national conversation  on #MeToo to #TimesUp, and now gender equity as one that has always been there, but is now out of the shadows. In her research she came across a study that indicates that at the rate women are going in the workplace, it will take about 100 years to reach gender equity.  WFF is striving to cut that time by many years. They are striving to be the solution to the things that are holding women back from success.

The leadership conference offers a variety of speakers and topics.  The topics are as varied as the women and the positions they now have, and the ones they are striving to attain. The conference is built to assist, teach and mentor.  The leadership conference content is driven by the participants.  Participants have given their thoughts and comments on speakers and topics they feel would be helpful to them.

This year the conference will launch the “Lead the Way” initiative.  Broadcaster and author Maria Shriver, broadcaster Gretchen Carlson and former first lady of the United States Michelle Obama have been selected to christen the initiative.

The conference hopes that the women in attendance will takeaway many things, but one in particular–they want the women to focus on themselves in developing themselves.  The conference itself focuses on three areas: the industry (attracting great talent), the organization (companies want to know how it leads and attracts talent at all generations) and the attendees (what talents do they have, what do they want to do, getting great connections and one of the most important things–how can they pass on this valuable learning experience).

To learn more about the WFF and it’s goals or to register for the conference, please go to: Women’s FoodService Forum.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear” we don’t have 100 years.

 

 

At The Texas Conference For Women–Women Rock

It is always great to be in the presence of women, especially smart women.  The Texas Conference for Women has so much to see, hear and do that it is hard to decide which way to go. That is why you see me rushing almost running in the halls of the Austin Convention Center with my two bags, comfortable shoes, and phone. I was off to races.

Texas Conference 2 Photo by Getty

I was able to snag two great interviews with two amazing women.  My first interview came as a surprise.  We just struck up a conversation, and I knew women would love to know about her company “iFundWomen”.  Below is the interview that I did with the CEO and founder of “iFundWomen”, Ms. Karen Cahn. For women who are looking for ways to fund their startup, she is the person to know.

20171102_120111 (2)

My second interview was with the Emmy award winner, Ms. Gaby Natale.  She is the host of the Emmy award-winning show Super Latina, and now the author of the book El Circulo Virtuoso.  Her story is one that a lot of people can identify with. She is inspirational.  My interview with Gaby is below.

Both women are successful entrepreneurs who have found their passions and turned them into their careers.  As each would tell you it has been a journey that has taken some unexpected turns.  They epitomize the women that attended and participated in the Texas Conference for Women.  This year there were 7,500 women in attendance from all over the United States.

Each of the women had their own schedule to adhere to and knew which sessions they wanted to attend and why.  All of us were able to hear the three keynote speakers, Ms. Anita Hill, Ms. Sheryl Sandberg, and Ms. Viola Davis.  Their presentations were informative and more.  You can see some of Ms. Anita Hill’s talInstagramFacebook Page–thisisyourbestyear, Instagram–thisisyourbestyear and Twitter–@mariciajohns.

If you have never attended this conference, you should think about it for next year.  There is something for everyone from, pitching your product to QVC, working on your Linkedin Page, coping with grief, fitness and much more.

This is one of the highlights of my year, seeing and hearing the speakers and meeting up with other bloggers, photographers, and other media again.  Hope you will take advantage of this great gathering of women.  Remember “thisisyourbestyear”.

To find out more about how to fund your business go to the “iFundWomen” website.

www.ifundwomen.com

If you would like to know about Gaby Natale, and how to contact her for speaking engagements, book signings and more please visit her website.

www.gabynatale.com

Join me on Instagram!

We’re on Instagram as @thisisyourbestyear. Install the app to follow my photos and videos. https://instagram.com/download/?r=380485317

You can also follow us on Facebook–thisisyourbestyear, Twitter–@mariciajohns and of course our website–www.thisisyourbestyear.com.

          Remember “thisisyourbestyear”.