Here’s One Question to Help You Know What Type of Business to Start in Retirement

*guest post by Mike Lieberman

You’re looking to start a business in retirement, but you’re not sure what type of business makes sense for you.

There are so many different types of businesses you can start these days.

Where do you even begin?

There’s one key question you must ask yourself when deciding what type of business to pursue, and if you don’t, you’ll end up wasting your time and money.

Let’s avoid that mistake all together. Shall we?

What’s the question to ask yourself?

To help you get more clarity, I sought out a retirement coach who specializes in assisting Professionals and Executives as they make retirement transitions with the life side of retirement planning. His name is Kevin Lyles of Winning Retirement Coach. He’s also the Head of Education for Rock Retirement Club.

I wanted to get his perspective for you on this since he deals with such scenarios on a regular basis.

I asked Kevin, “If a client was to say to you they’re thinking of starting a business in retirement, what’s the first question you would ask them?”

“What do they want to get out of the business?” responded Kevin. “That will lead to how I could counsel them because there are many possible answers.”

Before getting into some of the answers Kevin shared with me, let’s dive into why this question is important.

Why must you answer this question

Up until this stage of your life, the work and career part has been mostly out of necessity. It’s commanded a large part of your time over the years because there are these bills and taxes we all must pay.

As you enter this next stage, the work and career part plays a completely different role. You now have more free time and you’re not as reliant on it as your main source of income each month.

This means the type of business you choose to pursue needs to align with the greater vision of how you now want to spend your time.

That vision completely shifts the thinking about the type of business you start and why that question becomes so much more important to get clear on.

Previously work and career dictated how you spent your time, now you have more control over it.

So let’s get clear on what you want to get out of your business to make sure it aligns with your vision.

Ok?

Five common answers

Kevin shared five common answers to “what do you want to get out of your business?” with me.

So let’s dive deeper into each of them.

1. I need the income
If you’re retired and you need to replace your income to continue living, you might consider continuing to work or seeking other employment.

Let’s be real. Starting a business is not easy and it’s not going to be instantly successful overnight. It’s going to take time to start producing income, if it ever does.

So if you need the business to replace income dollar for dollar, take other options into consideration.

Though if you’re within a few years of retirement and think you’ll need to replace the income, now might be a good time to start. That way you can build up the business without the pressure of instant success.

2. Extra spending money
Your financial retirement plan might be rock solid and your financial needs are met with your pension, 401K and/or savings.

What you might want to get out of your business might be extra play money.

Each year you want to take you and your entire family on a vacation.

There’s a charity you’re passionate about and want to donate to them financially.

Maybe there’s a lavish purchase you want to make for you or a loved one.

Starting a business can help to reach that goal.

3. Build a legacy for your children
Building a legacy to pass down to your children can mean many things.

It might mean building a business to hand down to your kids.

Possibly it’s building more wealth to hand down to future generations.

The legacy could be leading by example and showing your family that anything is possible at any age.

Leaving a legacy such as these might be what you want to get out of your business.

4. Solving problems for others
It’s common for people to start a business around something they’re good at and can help others with.

“That was something I liked to do,” said Kevin. “During my legal career I was working mostly for corporate clients, but I really liked helping them with their problems. So this way (through coaching), I can do it on a much more personal level to really help counsel people through their retirement transition.”

5. Purpose and meaning
As mentioned earlier, work has taken up so much of our time during our life. There will now be the large void of time.

“That’s a problem a lot of retirees face after working,” said Kevin. “If they’ve been working 10-12 hour days for 30-40 years, now they wake up and don’t know what to do with themselves. Having a business can really fill that void and give them some purpose and reason to get up in the morning.”

“If they’ve been working 10-12 hour days for 30-40 years, now they wake up and don’t know what to do with themselves.”
– Kevin Lyles, Winning Retirement Coach

Those are just some of the answers to help you get some clarity and start thinking.

Once you know what you’re looking to get out of your business, you can now focus on the details around the structure and opportunities that support your vision.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”–make the best out of your retirement years.

**Mike Lieberman is the founder of Retirement Redefinition. He created the site to help you define your retirement lifestyle and start an online business that fits it.

Top Jobs For Seniors Who Want To Work After Retiring

*Guest post by Tina Martin

It’s not uncommon for seniors to decide to return to the workforce part-time after retirement. There are many benefits to taking this route. For one thing, research shows that individuals tend to be happier in retirement if they keep busy and maintain a sense of purpose. A fulfilling part-time job can help towards this end. 

Money is another obvious motivator for those who choose to get a job after retiring. Many seniors worry about running out of money without a steady income. According to the Journal of Accountancy, it’s actually the number one fear among retirees. 

Not sure what job to pursue? Get inspired with the below ideas.

Sell insurance

Many people need to purchase insurance, so working in the insurance industry can be an excellent option for seniors, especially if you have a background in sales. For example, you could sell life insurance to other seniors, and you may be able to take on friends and family as your first clients. Before you look into selling insurance, research the best options for retirees.

Teach English as a second language

One key to figuring out what career path to take after retirement is to consider your transferable skills. Whatever you were doing before retirement may still serve you afterwards. If you worked in education, for instance, you might consider teaching English as a second language, either for kids or adults. 

If you want to go this route, you should get an ESL teacher certification. With this under your belt, you can apply to area language schools for part-time gigs or work on a freelance basis for yourself. The latter option gives you great flexibility in terms of timing, as you can decide when and where to work, and decide how many students to take on based on your availability and interest.

Become a tour guide

A tour guide job is a wonderful way to keep your mind active. You will have to memorize facts and statistics, and continually brush up your knowledge. This kind of brain activity will keep you sharp and stave off mental decline. Research even shows that such brain challenges can help prevent Alzheimer’s disease. You’ll also benefit from physical activity, as the job requires you to be on your feet and continuously moving. 

There are tour guide jobs available to suit all types of tastes. If you are interested in art, history, and architecture, you can check out a gig at a museum. If you would prefer to spend time outside, take a look at the platform ToursByLocals, which allows you to present tours around your hometown to interested visitors. This is also a fun way to meet and interact with diverse people from different places, cultures, and countries. 

Consider seasonal work to get started

Reentering the working world if you’ve been retired for a few years may be daunting at first. Get your toes wet by starting off with a seasonal job. There are various senior-friendly options available, such as wrapping gifts for stores. There are also non-holiday related seasonal jobs available. This AARP list suggests options like tax preparer, tutor, and National Park Service employee.

Explore the above options and you are sure to find a post-retirement gig that interests you, even if that involves launching your very own home-based business. As you reenter the workforce, you will also benefit from the increased contact with other people, which combats the isolation that sometimes comes with age. A part-time job will thus pave the way to a happier and healthier retirement. Remember “thisisyourbestyear”.

*Tina stays busy as a life coach and works hard to help herself and her clients achieve a healthy work-life balance.

Surviving Social Distancing

So we have been told to stay at home, and some of us are having a hard time while others have found new callings, and our new wardrobe. Why is it so hard for some of us to be alone when really in todays world we are never alone? You know with all the social media there is always someone there.

I actually don’t remember my first few days of social distancing since I was frantically converting my face-to-face classes to online classes. It had to be done, and done quickly. After working furiously and relentlessly it was time to rest. So my next few days of social distancing were spent in pajamas. It was time to catch up on rest (you can catch up).

My first days were spent going from the bed to my favorite chair(s). There was a lot of looking at magazines, trying to find something to watch on television–I can’t binge watch. It helped that it was raining all day and night.

I kept in touch with friends and family by calling, texting, social media and more. My kids and I could see each other over the phone/computer. So all in all it wasn’t that bad. My husband was still going to court for a few hours a day, and that helped.

When you can’t go anywhere it makes you want to go more, and it was beginning to happen to my friends and me. Then we all decided that there was things that we could do.

Here are some of the things that we did:

  • Got up and moved. There were those that could do an exercise program via the internet, social media, television and more. You can do a different one every day. I have found out that I have no rhythm–Latin Zumba and I do not see eye to eye. I did however keep moving. There are some people who took walks around the block or on the track. Some that finally used that stationary bike and other equipment that was collecting dust.
  • When the sun finally came out there was yard work to be done, mowing the lawn, trimming the hedges, repotting plants and even planting flowers and that vegetable garden. I repotted plants, planted a vegetable garden, but then ran into a snake so no flowers were planted in the front flower boxes (and they may not get planted this season).
  • Many of us were a little bit more culinary inclined. Instead of preparing what we always prepared, we tried different things. We took out those gadgets, you know the Instant Pot, the airfryer, the electric skillet–we finally figured out what the convection button was on the oven.
  • Some of us even briefly went out. My sister and I went to the location of Hardie’s Fresh Foods truck, and got fruits and vegetables. They did social distancing. You never got out of the car–they bought everything to your car and loaded it.
  • We held our first Meet and Greet–Girl Talk via Zoom. Our next one is April 3 at 8 pm CST via Zoom. (Use the ID 843-171-852).
  • Deep cleaning your house is always an option. My shutters and blinds are getting deeped cleaned, and are now their original bright white.
  • Hopefully creative juices will start to flow like a river and not a slow moving one.
  • Read just for pleasure. I’m reading another Robert Parker book. It helps that I imagine Tom Selleck as Jesse Stone.
  • Prayers..no need to say anything else.

There are so many other things that people are doing and dealing with during this pandemic. Reach out to those that are truly alone, give them a call, send them a quick note. There are a large group of people who do not do social media. Remember “thisisyourbestyear“, please be safe.

Our next Zoom “Girl Talk” will be on Friday, April 3 at 8 PM CST. Please use the ID 843-171-852. See you soon.

NOW ON YOUTUBE–BOSS WOMEN AND US!

We’ve started a new series, in fact, we’ve started a YouTube Channel. The channel is “thisisyourbestyear”, and we have been hard at work on it.

In the past we have had one or two videos that we have shared on YouTube, but we have now decided to go all in so that we can keep you informed on all levels. We’ve decided to expand the blog.

Our first official venture is a series that we entitled “Boss Women”. These are women who are entrepreneurs, community leaders and more. These are women who work hard while multitasking. These are “Boss Women”, women who are the “boss” of not only their businesses, but their lives.

Each boss woman is different in the ways they came into their entrepreneurial self. Some knew from the very start while others worked in corporate and decided it was not for them, retired or maybe stayed home to raise the children, and now find themselves empty nesters.

There will be so many other things that we will post to YouTube in the future. We’re working all the kinks out of our recordings, doing research on equipment we need (and can afford) to make the videos better.

If you are a “Boss Woman” or know a “Boss Woman” who might want to be interviewed for our series send us an email. We want to showcase their businesses and them. Just by interviewing them may give another woman the sign they need to becoming their own boss.

Remember you can now read us on our website and on these social media sites. Each one of them may have something different so give them a look.

  • Facebook—thisisyourbestyear
  • Instagram–thisisyourbestyear
  • YouTube— thisisyourbestyear
  • Tumblr—- thisisyourbestyear
  • Twitter—- thisisyourbestyear@mariciajohns

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”, and this journey of women of a certain age gets better because we are the “boss” of our lives.

4 Tips For Taking Your Home-Based Business From Couch To Dream Office

*Guest post by Tina Martin

Many women of a certain age have decided they want to start their own business and work out of their home at their leisure. One of the main problems they/we run into is that we have always worked in an office setting. This post by Tina Martin will help you turn your couch into an efficient office.

Is a lack of space holding back your home-based business? Workspace challenges are one of the most common obstacles that home-based business owners face, so you’re definitely not alone with these woes. If you want to have your best year yet, and help your home-based business thrive, however, you have to find creative ways to solve those home workspace challenges. So if you are ready to take your home-based business to the next level of success, here are some tips for creating your dream office at home: 

Bigger Business Dreams May Require a Bigger Home

Sometimes what you really need to create your dream home workspace is to move to a bigger place. You can research local home prices to see if this is a reasonable move for your new business ventures—home sale prices in Fort Worth are averaging $255,000. Keep in mind that having more space means more options for creating a home office and organized storage. So if you would need to rent storage space or an office, moving to a new home could actually save you some serious cash in the long run. Aside from financial and business considerations, other signs that you need more living space are dealing with clutter in your current home or not wanting to deal with the high costs of renovating. If you feel like your quality of life or productivity is suffering, it may also be time to buy a bigger home. 

Smart Home Office Design May Require Outside Help 

When business is booming, you should consider any investments you make into your new home workspace as investments in the future success of your home-based business. This includes any fees you may pay for professional designers, who can help create the best layout for a productive home office. If you’re concerned that hiring professionals is outside your budget, Business Insider explains that some companies offer free design services, or will at least provide a cost-free consultation. These services are often complimentary when you purchase home office products from major retailers like Pottery Barn or West Elm.

DIY Renovations Can Boost ROI on Home Workspaces 

If you feel comfortable wielding tools, then you may be able to save even more on your new home workspace. That’s because by using DIY websites to tackle renovation tasks and project to-dos, you will be able to avoid paying hefty contractor fees. These sites are full of resources for handy homeowners and home-based business owners, including tips for putting together a project budget and tutorials for building custom furniture. So if you have the time and attention to detail, refer to these DIY resources to create your dream home office. To keep those DIY projects from becoming disasters, you will want to consider some key points before you start. Safety should always be top concern, so leave more complex remodeling jobs to professionals. 

Small Touches Can Help Keep a Home Office Organized 

Once you have the bones of your new home workspace all worked out, you can move onto the finer details. Just keep in mind that design and decor details can really make or break the feel of your home office, so give these touches the same consideration as major project elements. For example, the paint colors you choose for your office walls can either hinder or help creativity and productivity. So if you want a burst of energy during your workday, opt for a sunny yellow color, but if you prefer to enhance your concentration, warm hues of pink or peach may be best. Decor can also play a key role in improving your home office space and can even add storage—consider getting a few decorative bins, which you can buy on Amazon for $29.99.

There are so many perks to having a dedicated workspace in your home, especially if you are trying to grow your home-based business. Creating your dream home office can help you keep your life balanced, and it can also offer a space to keep you productive. Plus, you may even be able to take advantage of tax benefits that will give you more room for future business projects.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear” let’s get busy.

* Tina stays busy as a life coach and works hard to help herself and her clients achieve a healthy work-life balance.

Grandparents As Parents

Being a grandparent is one of the best things this side of heaven. Each grandparent thinks their grandchildren are the cutest in the world. Their grandchildren are the smartest, so much smarter than their children were at that age. When grandchildren come to visit, grandparents give them almost anything they desire. They let them do whatever their hearts can imagine and more. This is so true for the preteen grandchildren. As they grow into teenage years it’s another story. Grandparents love grandchildren because after all the fun they have, the food they have eaten, the playing they have done and much more they are packed up and sent home to their parents. Grandparents can then go back to whatever they want to do–they’ve earned it.

Some grandparents can’t send their grandchildren home to their parents because they have become the parents. There have always been grandparents that raised their grandchildren for some reason. There was always Big Mama Susie, Granny Louise, Paw Paw, Daddy James and more who took on the role of raising a grandchild.

In the state of Texas alone there are approximately 823,750 children under the age of 18 living in homes where the householders are grandparents or other relatives with the majority living with grandparents.

According to the Grandfacts State Fact Sheets there are over 315,000 grandparents that are raising grandchildren. Of those:

  • 67% are under the age 60
  • 62% are still in the workforce
  • 23% live in poverty
  • 23% have a disability
  • 26% are unmarried (grandchildren are living with a single parent)

These grandparents having raised their children have once again taken on the responsibility for the day-to-day maintenance of a home, schedules, meals, homework, play dates and more. These items may seem simple, but homework is not the same as it was a generation ago. Years ago play dates consisted of going outside and playing with the kids in the neighborhood. There was no scheduling of activities. Birthday parties consisted of cake, punch and a few games in the backyard or den. There was no social media, cell phones and internet. In addition to time, the majority of these things carry a monetary component.

The grandparents who are raising their grandchildren now have to redo their lives, their dreams and much more. They have to give up their independence and start all over again. Their finances will ultimately take a hit, and retirement may not be in the picture in the near future. That dream of finally starting their own business has again become just a dream.

All of this is not to say that grandparents do not cherish their grandchildren, it’s just that their lives or at least the idea of what their lives should look like at this stage of life will have to change. Their new normal is not the normal they day dreamed about.

There are programs that will assist the grandparents in their new role as primary parents. At my church a senior group meets once a month to talk about the good, the bad and the ugly of raising grandchildren when you thought you would only see them on the weekends. It allows the grandparents to learn from others who are in similar situations, and to give guidance to those that need it .

In every state there are organizations that will assist those that are raising children for the second time. AARP has great information in the Grandfacts sheets for the United States and for your state. There are local programs that can assist also.

Grandparents may need a little help when raising grandchildren. Those that take on this task are indeed “grand”. Remember “thisisyourbestyear”, and just in case you didn’t know my grandchild is the cutest and smartest.

Our USA Today Best Years Magazine Interview

We were interviewed by the award winning journalist Jennifer E. Mabry for the USA Today Best Years (Fabulous Living at 50+) 2019 Fall/Winter edition. The topic of the discussion was “50–Embracing Midlife”. It is a topic that “thisisyourbestyear” is very familiar with.

Adding to the conversation were three other women of a certain age. They were Amy Yontef-McCrath who is a volunteer extraordinaire who sat a goal of volunteering to at least 50 projects between birthday 49 and 50. She completed it with time to spare, and is now deciding upon the next goal for this part of her life.

Also included in the conversation was relationship expert and therapist Dr. Audrey Chapman. She gave insight into being mentally and physically healthy as we mature. Brigid Schulte who is an author and journalist discussed work-life balance as we enter different phases of our life.

It was our honor to be included in this conversation. The link to the article is below. You can purchase the magazine at your local news stands or on line on the USA Today Magazines site.

Embracing Midlife

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”. You are never too old to live your best life and do the “happy dance”–we are proof. Just go for it.

Maybe We Should Be More Like Millennials

So we have decided that we will continue to work after we retire. We want to do something different, something that we have always wanted to so. Something that feeds our soul and our passion. Maybe we just want to do something where we are productive, something where there is a chance to get out of the house and communicate with others. There are many reasons that women and men of a certain age want to continue to work after their formal retirement.

Most of us remember when we first started to work and people would wonder if we were old enough for the job. Guess what? Now they wonder are we too old for the job.

You see that gray hair can be a giveaway to our age, and age discrimination is real. I know there are millennials sporting the gray look, but for the most part they get theirs out of a box.

Take it from someone who has finally divorced hair color and decided it is what it is. It does seem interesting that most of the people in power around the world are gray haired or other unnatural hair colors, but when it comes to getting a job it is a deterrent to the interviewer. It’s hard to even get an interview or get through the interview when the interviewer sees you as his mother or God forbid his grandmother.

This article by columnist Mitchel Schnurman recently appeared in the Dallas Morning News. It is an opinion piece, but personally I think it speaks the truth. Does gray hair stop you from getting pass the interview?

Then it hit me, maybe we should follow the lead of the millennials. Remember when we wouldn’t hire them because their hair was blue, hot pink, too long, dredded or whatever? What did they do? They started their own businesses. Why not start our own business doing what we want? We have the time, the experience and education so why not go for it?

Millennials did not wait for baby boomers to hire them so why are we waiting on them to hire us? We taught them to go for it. Let’s take our own advice and just do it.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”. What are you waiting for?

Women Over 50 Are Starting Businesses Left and Right. Should You?

*Guest post by Lucy Reed

You’ve spent years in a career that doesn’t fulfill you, and frankly, you’re tired of it! Now that you’re getting older, you’re serious about spending your time in ways that count.

Does that sound like you? You’re not alone: Lots of women over 50 are chasing their entrepreneurial dreams now that they have the time, confidence, and financial capital to do so.

Why Women Over 50 Start Businesses

Some women start businesses out of necessity. Older women who have recently lost a job or who are reentering the workforce find themselves disappointed by job prospects and decide to create their own opportunity. Other women discover they finally have the time and energy for a passion project now that they’re older. And with fewer people depending on them, older women have more freedom to take risks and fully commit to a business.

The Traits of Successful Female Entrepreneurs

Entrepreneurship isn’t for everyone. You have to be willing to take on financial risk, put yourself out there, and juggle a ton of responsibilities. For some people, it’s a role that comes naturally, while others have perfected the art of faking it until they make it. But if entrepreneurial traits like tenacity, dedication, and risk-taking aren’t in your playbook, business ownership might not be for you.

That doesn’t mean you have to be a cutthroat business woman or a natural salesperson to be a successful entrepreneur. Plenty of over-50 women start businesses in the nonprofit sector or become consultants and solopreneurs. However, whether you’re running a multinational corporation or a one-woman bookkeeping service, you need to be comfortable with marketing yourself and maintaining a public image.

Financial Considerations for Older Entrepreneurs

Starting a business can be a way to grow your income add to your nest egg after 50, but it’s no guarantee. Launching any business is a financial risk, and it’s even more so for women, who are likely to tap personal savings for startup capital. That’s because women entrepreneurs have a harder time than men raising startup capital for business ventures.

While it’s possible to tap retirement savings to start a business, the process is convoluted, and a mistake could lead to hefty IRS penalties. There’s also the risk that your business doesn’t succeed and the loss sets your retirement back years. Before going this route, explore other funding options like Small Business Administration microloans, alternative lenders, or even crowdfunding.  

Steps to Starting a Small Business

There’s a lot of work that has to be done before getting to the fun parts of business ownership, like building a brand and pitching your product or service. If you’re interested in starting a small business, take these steps to get started.

  • Assess the feasibility of your business idea. You have a great idea, but is it a profitable one? It doesn’t matter how much creativity or passion you have if you’re selling something no one wants to buy. Conduct research and surveys to evaluate who your target market is, what their needs are, and how much they’re willing to pay to have those needs met.
  • Obtain licenses and permits. The licenses and permits you need depend on the nature of your business. At minimum, you’ll need to register your business and file for an EIN.
  • Identify key partnerships. Strong networks make strong businesses. Establish relationships with suppliers, retailers, local businesses, and other partners who can help your business grow.
  • Create a marketing plan. Websites, social media, local marketing–today’s entrepreneurs have a lot of opportunities to get their ideas in front of an audience. Before launching campaigns, determine which marketing channels are best for your target audience.

There’s no expiration date on entrepreneurship. Whether you’re 26 or 55, if you have a good idea, you can turn it into a profitable business venture. While starting a business after 40 can feel like a leap of faith, sometimes that leap is just what you need to bring purpose and passion to your life.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”–look before you leap.

*Lucy Reed has been starting businesses since she was a kid, from the lemonade stand she opened in her parent’s drivway at age 10 to the dog walking business she started while in college. She created GigMine.co because she was inspired by the growth of the sharing economy and wanted to make it easier for entrepreneurial individuals like herself to find the gig opportunities in their areas.

5 Simple Steps For Landing A Seasonal Job During The Holidays

*guest post by Erica Francis

seasonal employment

5 Simple Steps for Landing a Seasonal Job During the Holidays

Interested in a little extra cash this holiday season? A seasonal job is a great way to buffer a period of unemployment or offset your spending on gifts. It might even be just what you need to get your foot in the door for a more permanent position of employment. Check out these tips to help you land the perfect position this holiday season!

1. Consider if a Seasonal Job Right for You

Before you start searching for seasonal work, go over the pros and cons with yourself. On top of making some extra money, seasonal jobs can get you big discounts on holiday purchases and help you build up your resume for future job searches. But the work doesn’t come without its drawbacks. Many seasonal jobs offer low pay and little training so they may not be great options if you’re looking to advance your career. Additionally, you have to be ready to accept a tough schedule, which may involve working during evenings and weekends. This can conflict with travel plans and reduce your free time to spend with friends and family,

2. Take a Look at Your Options

Not all seasonal jobs are retail positions. Although you may be happy to fill in at the mall during the holiday rush, you have other options. Customer service representatives, social media assistants and seasonal recruiters are in high demand during the holiday season. Additionally, seasonal decorators and event planners are highly sought after by stores, offices, and homeowners alike. You may even want to consider personal gift shopping or working as a professional Santa. If you aren’t interested in a holiday position, pet sitting might be a great option for you. Many people travel during the holidays and need someone who can tend to their pets while they’re away.

3. Start Searching for Opportunities

Care.com recommends seeking out work that you enjoy rather than taking the first job that comes along. You can find hidden career opportunities by looking for entry-level positions in a field that you enjoy. If you’re interested in fashion, try applying for work in a clothing store. If you like journalism, start with a job at the library. Try to network as much as possible by talking to friends, family, and even strangers who may be able to help you get a lead on a job. Reach out to people online and be sure to meet them in person to establish valuable relationships. Volunteering in your community during the holidays is a great way to make connections, gain references, and test out your field of interest as well.

4. Polish Your Resume

Seasonal work is competitive, so make sure you apply with an eye-catching resume to set yourself apart. Personalize your resume for each job you apply for, paying close attention to the skills and experience required by the position. If you have gaps in your work history or many seasonal jobs, try switching up your resume format to focus on skills and experience rather than past employment. Consider putting your related skills near the top of your resume so managers can see that you would be adept at the position. Have a separate section on your resume for any past temporary positions labeled either “holiday” or “seasonal” so recruiters don’t think you frequently hop between jobs.

5. Ace the Interview

Although the job you’re applying for is temporary, recruiters will still put you through a thorough interview. Be prepared to answer questions about your flexibility, why you’re interested in temporary work and what your plans are for when the season ends. Don’t forget to do your research on the company and have a familiarity with their products and services.

Although the holidays are rich in employment opportunities, start looking for work early. According to Snag, over half of employers have already filled their seasonal positions before the busy seasons starts. You’ll have more options to choose from if you get a head start. That way, you’re more likely to land a job that you can actually enjoy.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”.  Let’s get that job!

*Erica Francis has an important mission: to help people prepare for successful careers in today’s tough job market. At ReadyJob.org, Erica helps develop lesson plans and other educational resources, all geared toward helping the site’s visitors build the skills needed to excel in any workplace.