Sheltering In Place Movie Watching

There are a lot of things that I have been doing since I have been sheltering in place. So far I am not bored yet. A lot of people are binge watching television, but for some reason I can’t binge watch. I have, however, found some things that have caught my attention on television. Here are three movies/documentaries that I found interesting and entertaining. Each of them is different than the others.

The first one is the beautiful movie–“Of Mind and Music”. It is literally about the mind and music. This story is about a doctor whose mother has died from complications of Alzheimer’s, and his struggle to get his life back together after her death. The location of the movie is New Orleans which should tell you about the music.

While taking time off to mourn the death of his mother he encounters two street musicians, one being a beautiful singer with a name just as beautiful as the songs she sings. She is known as Una Vida to some and Queenie to others. Una Vida has the voice of an angel as long as she is singing, but also has demons that rob her of her life when not singing. This is story of voices lost and found not only Una Vida’s, but those that know and love her.

You will enjoy the sights, culture, music and sense of loss in this beautiful movie. This movie will move you.

It’s something about seeing the place where music legends started from. Seeing the piano with the keys labeled, the bathroom where they went into record that special sound and so much more will bring a song to your heart. In Detroit it’s the sound of Motown. But if you can’t get there soon try looking at the documentary “Hitsville the Making of Motown (Berry Gordy and Smokey Robinson).

The two legends talk about life before Motown and more. There are interviews with some of the music legends, and those who help to make them legends. Berry Gordy tells about his organizational plan for Motown which by the way was sheer genius. It’s nice just to see two friends whose friendship is a true friendship, and of course the music is timeless. There are things discussed that you already know, but there are tidbits that will amaze you. You will enjoy the information, and the big sing along.

“Faith, Hope and BBQ”, yep you read it correctly. This true story is about a small church, their faith, their hope and their barbeque. Throughout the movie they remind you that the church was built because of the selling of barbeque.

You will meet the man who cooks the barbeque who is also the pastor of this congregation. The story of the church that barbeque built in a small town is more about the love the congregation feels for their faith, family and community.

You will meet the members of the church who volunteer their cooking talents for the betterment of the church. The smoke from the pits will have you thinking you can actually smell and taste the meat. When one who works in the kitchen tells you she is famous for her collard greens, you will believe her.

This small, rural church and their love and faith are just a joy to see. They will have you saying Amen and pass the hot water cornbread, and the napkins.

These three things on television caught my attention and kept it throughout the films. Take a look, I don’t think you will be sorry. Remember “thisisyourbestyear”, and be safe.

What Happens To The Spouse Of The Alzheimer’s Patient?

What happens to the spouse of an Alzheimer’s patient as they see the person they married slowly taken away from them? I remember first hearing about Barry Petersen and his wife *Jan, and now Dan Gasby and his wife B. Smith.

I’ve even written about the effects that it can have on the spouse, the toll it takes on them both mentally and physically in our April 28, 2018 post Alzheimer’s Caregivers “Til Death Do Us Part”.

These two spouses clearly have made difficult decisions. Are they wrong or right? Is this something that we talk about with our spouses before hand?

What are your thoughts? What are the spouses to do? Remember “thisisyourbestyear”, and sometimes life is hard. We really can’t say what we would do in a difficult situation until we are faced with it.

*Jan Petersen passed away in 2013 after being cared for by her husband.

Alzheimer’s Caregivers–“Til Death Do Us Part”

It attacks the brain and is the most common type of dementia–this is Alzheimer’s. There is no age requirement when it comes to the early onset of Alzheimer’s. We tend to think of our parents and grandparents when we think of Alzheimer’s, but the youngest person diagnosed with it was only 27.

The stories below are some of the examples of what it means when one states in their wedding vow: “til death do us part”. Each one of these has taken a different approach.

Mike and Carol’s journey was one that Mike was determined to make with her at home. Over the course of 10 years, and his health failing both mentally and physically he had to make a decision. A decision that was the best for both of them. Mike made the decision that even with 24 hour a day caregivers Carol needed more. He made the decision to put her into a facility.

As some caregivers think back over time, they realize there may have been signs they may have missed. As Barry Petersen talks about his wife, he tells how she changed years earlier before she was diagnosed.

All of the caregivers vowed to always take care of their spouse. They came to the realization that taking care of them meant they must face the difficult decision to put their love one into a care facility, not only for their care but the care of themselves.

Take a look at Barry and Jan and their journey with Alzheimer’s. Jan has since passed away.

Dan and B were the “it” couple that I watched on her weekly lifestyle show. From their beautifully decorated home in Sag Harbor to her wonderful restaurant that I visited in Washington, DC. They seemed to be living the dream until….. As of the writing of this article, B. Smith still remains at her home in Sag Harbor with Dan.

One important take away from all three of these cases is that couples should talk about their wishes if they become afflicted by this disease. The caregiver should have instructions that will make his/her decision on care much easier, and with less guilt.

As we mature, we do seem to forget more which does not mean that we have Alzheimer’s. The chart below is a simple way to explains the difference.

alzheimer anddementia

Alzheimer’s came to my family with my paternal grandmother. It was something that seemed to strike out of nowhere, and life-altering decisions had to be made immediately. My grandfather had died years earlier, but I know that he would have been like the spouses above, he would take care of his wife as she had always taken care of him. Even though in the later years of his life he was in failing health, he would be determined–“til death do us part”. Some conversations are hard to have, but a necessity as life continues.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”. Taking care of someone does not mean doing it all alone there are resources.

Try these sites and others for information on being a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s Support Programs and Information

National Institute on Aging

AARP Help and Support for Alzheimer’s Caregivers

Simple Tests That Could Save Your Life

Just recently I saw a report on a man in his 30’s that had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. Most of us, even women of a certain age tend to think of this affecting people who are much older.

We all know of someone who has trouble getting up out of chairs. We all know someone whose quality of sleep has changed dramatically over the years.

These simple tests in the link below may not mean that you are ill, but they can give you a hint as to what you need to talk with your doctor about.

Take the tests, give them to you parents, friends and others.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”.

http://pubs.aarp.org/aarptm/20140203_PR/m1/MobileArticle.action?articleId=387247&pg=18&mobileWeb=true&lm=1391307907000