Maybe We Should Be More Like Millennials

So we have decided that we will continue to work after we retire. We want to do something different, something that we have always wanted to so. Something that feeds our soul and our passion. Maybe we just want to do something where we are productive, something where there is a chance to get out of the house and communicate with others. There are many reasons that women and men of a certain age want to continue to work after their formal retirement.

Most of us remember when we first started to work and people would wonder if we were old enough for the job. Guess what? Now they wonder are we too old for the job.

You see that gray hair can be a giveaway to our age, and age discrimination is real. I know there are millennials sporting the gray look, but for the most part they get theirs out of a box.

Take it from someone who has finally divorced hair color and decided it is what it is. It does seem interesting that most of the people in power around the world are gray haired or other unnatural hair colors, but when it comes to getting a job it is a deterrent to the interviewer. It’s hard to even get an interview or get through the interview when the interviewer sees you as his mother or God forbid his grandmother.

This article by columnist Mitchel Schnurman recently appeared in the Dallas Morning News. It is an opinion piece, but personally I think it speaks the truth. Does gray hair stop you from getting pass the interview?

Then it hit me, maybe we should follow the lead of the millennials. Remember when we wouldn’t hire them because their hair was blue, hot pink, too long, dredded or whatever? What did they do? They started their own businesses. Why not start our own business doing what we want? We have the time, the experience and education so why not go for it?

Millennials did not wait for baby boomers to hire them so why are we waiting on them to hire us? We taught them to go for it. Let’s take our own advice and just do it.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”. What are you waiting for?

Interview Prep: How To Get Ready To Snag The Job Of Your Dreams

by Erica Francis

Interviewing for a job–especially when it’s a job you really want–can be overwhelming and stressful, which can cause issues for you when you’re speaking to the person in charge of hiring. You want to be relaxed, confident, and prepared in order to show how well you can handle yourself under pressure; this will give your potential employer a good idea of what you’ll be like if you’re hired. It’s not always easy, so it’s important to prepare as much as possible before the interview so you’ll feel comfortable.

Fortunately, there are several things you can do to get ready for the big day. From holding a mock interview to get familiar with possible questions to looking for ways to boost your confidence, you can start preparing weeks ahead of time. Ask a friend or family member to help you out, and start thinking about your physical appearance as it can be important when it comes to a first impression.

Keep reading for some wonderful tips on how to prep for a job interview.

Hold a mock interview

Ask a friend or family member to help you hold a mock interview; you can find some possible interview questions here. Thinking about your answers will help give you confidence on the big day and will prevent you from fumbling over your words when speaking to your potential employer. Think about how you want to present yourself, and write down sample answers to prepare; remember to speak eloquently and professionally, as this will reflect on you and your ability to interact with clients.

Get ready for your first impression

First impressions are incredibly important when it comes to job interviews, because it’s your chance to let your employer know what you’re all about. Don’t underestimate the power of a great outfit or a good haircut, and consider buying some new makeup or hair styling tools to help boost your confidence and give yourself a leg up on the competition. Go here for some great tips on how to get started.

Do some research

It’s imperative to do some research on the company you’re interviewing with so that when you’re asked what you know about their history, you can show how invested you are in the job. Get online and find out how many people they employ, what year they were founded, who the president is, and what their goals are. For instance, many companies these days are making more of an effort to go green for the environment; if this is important to you, it’s a great talking point in the interview.

Get some sleep

It can be difficult to get good rest the night before the big day, especially if you’re nervous. However, it’s imperative to get a good night’s sleep so you’ll be fresh and at the top of your game. Put away all screens–computer, television, and smartphone–at least an hour before you go to bed, and refrain from drinking anything with caffeine or eating meat (which is hard to digest and can interfere with your ability to go to sleep).

Getting ready for a job interview can be nerve-wracking, but it doesn’t have to be overwhelming. The best way to stay calm is to prepare as much as possible beforehand, and to give yourself plenty of time to do it so you won’t feel pressured. With a good plan and a little help from a loved one, you can make sure you’re ready to blow away your potential employer and snag the job of your dreams.

Remember “thisisyourbestyear”–be prepared to nail that job interview.

Interview The Interviewer

I haven’t gone on a professional job interview in eight years, but I do keep my resume recent since it will determine if I get to the next step, the interview. During an interview we all know the answers to most of the standard questions that are asked, but do we know what questions we should ask?

If you have been out of the job search market for a while you will need to brush up on your interviewing skills.  It’s not the interviewing you learned BC (before computers). You can have a face-to-face interview, a phone interview, a video interview and/or a combination interview.

 

The days of the interviewer asking if we have any questions, and we smile and say “no” are gone.  Don’t fret that is a good thing, because we all have unanswered questions after an interview.

First of all you should ask a couple of questions that you have prepared beforehand.   This will show the interviewer that you are interested in the position, and you will get answers to questions that are not on the company website or in their handbook.  It’s a win, win situation.

 

There have been a lot of articles written about this subject. Here are some questions that I think a person should ask when interviewing for a job.

  • What is a typical day for a person in this position? This question is important because you will be able to gain some insight into the structure of the work day for this position.  You will also learn what specific skills that are needed for this job.
  • What is the culture of the company?  This helps you know the company’s values, their beliefs and their working environment. You would be surprised that this question does not get asked.  You must be able to fit into the company to have a great working relationship.  We have all gone places, and thought that this is not for us. We have all felt like a fish out of water.
  • What are the expectations for this position in the next 30 days, 6 months–a year and beyond? This will tell you what the company is expecting from you if you get this position.
  • What’s did the previous holders of this position consider to be the hardest part of it, or what do you consider to be the most challenging part of the position? Even great positions have something that is somewhat challenging.
  • What is the average employment stay with the company?  This will show you if they promote from within.
  • Can you see where the position is housed?  This will enable you to see where you will perform the job duties.  You will also be able to talk with people who will be your coworkers.

If your interview consist of interviewing with multiple persons at different times, you can ask them some of the same questions, and you can also ask others that you jotted down while doing your research of the company.  Asking questions shows the interviewers that you are serious about the position.

Remember to send a thank you note–handwritten. You can also email a thank you letter, but not in place of the handwritten thank you note. Be sure to thank the receptionist/secretary when you leave–they have the ear of the boss, and their opinion counts.

If you really want the position, you will have questions about it?  Remember thisisyourbestyear“.  Interview the interviewer.